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Archive for the ‘how to buid wrist strength’ Category

Beginner Grip Training: Basic Hammer Movements for Wrist Strength

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

Beginner Grip Training Video Series

We are getting deeper and deeper into this series on Beginner Grip Training Methods. We’ve looked at entry-level plate inching, some of the aspects of gripper training, and even a thick bar training method you can do in just about ANY GYM. Now, it’s time to look at a way beginner grip trainees can work on developing their wrist strength.

Basic Sledge Hammer Movements for Wrist Strength

Sledge Hammer Levering can put a lot of torque on the wrist, and if you go too heavy, too soon, you can experience undue pain from the drills. In the video below, I show you some things you can do right now, as a beginner grip trainee, that are safe and entail less risk.

I hope today’s installment in the Beginner Grip Training Series has been helpful.

If you’ve got additional questions on developing your grip strength, be sure to leave a comment below, or contact me directly.

Either way, I look forward to hearing from you.

All the best in your training.

Jedd

Ready to Graduate to Bigger Hammers?
Then Get the Workout That Will Show You How:
Pick Up The LEVER BIGGER HAMMERS WORKOUT HERE

The Basics of Grip Training and Strongmanism DVD Set

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

It’s the beginning of a brand new week and I’ve got an announcement I’m happy to be FINALLY making.

The DVD Sets of the Basics of Grip Training and Strongmanism Seminar ARE READY!

This seminar took place at the end of March, and the attendees had GREAT things to say about it.

This is a 2-Disk DVD Set covering the Fundamentals of Grip Training and performing Strongman Feats.

Here’s how the seminar flowed, and how the DVD set goes:

DVD #1

1. Welcome

Just a quick meet-and-greet where we do introductions and I cover how I got into Grip Training and Feats of Strength.

2. Warm-up (03:24)

I knew the rides in to the seminar would be pretty long, and the last thing the guys wanted to do was just sit there, so the first thing we covered was the importance of proper warm-up, and I put the guys through the exact Warm-up protocol I go through each training session.

If you’re not Warming Up prior to your Grip Training sessions, you’re leaving strength on the table!

In my experience 2 out of 3 lifters do NOTHING before hitting grippers, besides doing a few reps of light grippers.

That’s a surefire way to not only never progress in your training, but how to GET HURT, as well.

Start implementing this routine ASAP to start instantly seeing benefits.

3. Grippers (23:06)

When you watch the Warm-up section, I encourage you to jump right down on the floor and go through it yourself. Then, grab a gripper and enjoy the Gripper section.

This section covers the importance of the Gripper Set. If you don’t have your set technique established, no drill will be able to get you where you want to be with your Gripper Training.

You’ll want to have a gripper there with you when you go through this section, so you can make sure you’re doing everything correctly with your gripper placement.

Before this section wraps up, you’ll also get to see what I consider the best gripper training drills. Most of these I do every single week, because I know how big of an impact they’ve had.

4. Pinch (1:04:54)

Now it’s time to focus on my bread and butter – Pinch Grip! Easily my favorite form of training, I do more of this than anything else.

In this section of the Disk, we talk about all the different types of Pinch Grip Training, and how the techniques for each type is similar and different from the others.

You’ll also see he nuances of how to place your thumb and hand on what you’re trying to pinch. One size DOES NOT fit all and you HAVE to make subtle adjustments depending on what you’re trying to Pinch.

DISK #2

1. Thick Bar

If there is any form of Grip Training that is a MUST for a true Strongman, it is Thick Bar, and we cover the topic in detail in this section.

From the use of Axles, to Fat Grip instant thick bar handles, to the most challenging types of thick-handled dumbbells like the Inch and the Death Grip Bells, you’re gonna see a host of ways to train Thick Bar for open hand strength.

You might be surprised how similar the techniques are between some of the Pinch Grip training methods and Thick Bar lifts, but when you learn about the importance of the thumb adductor pollicis muscles, it will all make sense.

2. Hub Q&A (32:01)

Before we branched out into Strongman Feats, we did one last Q&A session on Hub Style training.

Hub training is one of the few types of Grip Training where smaller hands are an advantage, believe it or not.

3. Feats of Strength (38:18)

In this section, you’ll see a little primer that I covered regarding something that many new Strongman Featists aren’t familiar with – Tension.

Feats of Strength are all about Creating and Managing Tension. Until you know how to use tension to your advantage basic feats like Card Tearing, Nail Bending, will give you trouble. But, once you master tension, the more complex feats like straightening Horseshoes come more within your reach.

4. Card Tearing (49:26)

The first Strongman Feat we jumped into was Card Tearing, and for good reason, too.

Card Tearing is the perfect feat to learn the production and management of tension.

With the techniques you’ll learn in this section, you’ll be ready to take your first steps as a strongman. You’re gonna love what it feels like to destroy a deck of poker cards!

5. Steel Bending (1:05:20)

My products have produced more certified Red Nail Benders than any other source out there, and with the info included in this section, that number is going to go up once again.

Steel Bending is easily the most addictive type of strength feat out there. There is something about how it feels when steel buckles under your might.

You get hooked on it, and before you know it, you want more and more. This portion of the video will show you how to do it the right way to see great progress and stay injury free.

6. Programming (1:23:04)

The biggest challenges about Grip Training and Feats of Strength isn’t how to get started or understanding technique. I’ve got all that covered for you.

The hardest thing is actually how to mesh Grip and Feats with the rest of your training. In this section I lay out some ways you can go about doing this the best way possible, without disrupting the rest of the training your doing and the goals you’re working on.

7. Soft Tissue (1:37:46)

As a special bonus, one of the attendees of the seminar, Dr. Jim Wagner, put us through a quick demo of some instruments he uses with his clients, called Hawk Grips.

We captured everything on video, and now you’ll get to see exactly what Dr. Jim does with his clients to get them out of pain and recovered from injuries and surgeries.

In total, this 2-Disk DVD Set is almost 4 hours of awesome content.

Order Your Copy TODAY => Basics of Grip Training and Strongmanism DVD

All the best in your training.

Jedd

Feedback from the Attendees


Left to Right: Dr. Jim Wagner, me, and Chris Fritz

Learned More in 5 Hours Than the Last 5 Years!

    “I got to spend the day at a seminar with the grip legend himself, Jedd Johnson. I learned more in 5 hours than I did in the last five years. It was an awesome day and Jedd is one of the nicest guys you could meet! I’ll be seeing you again Brother, hopefully at the next contest!”

    Chris Fritz

One of the Most Informational Courses I Have Taken!

    As a hand therapist and being in strength training for 28 plus years I found Jedd’s Essentials of Grip/Strongman Training Seminar one of the most informational courses I have taken! The information Jedd covered has made a huge impact on my training and how I look at treating my patients. Not only was the course informative, it was totally hands on!
    Jedd’s passion for the sport and approach to kinesthetic learning made the day!! Jedd laid the foundation for building diesel grip and forearm power! To anyone one who is considering getting into the arena of Grip sports or needs a change in training program Jedd’s course is a must have!
    Jedd Johnson CSCS is truly a national leader in the sport of Grip and Strongman competition!

    Jim Wagner OTD, OTR/L, CHT, CPAM, CSCS
    Doctor of Occupational Therapy
    Certified Hand Therapist
    Certified Strength and Conditions Specialist

If You Want a Strong Grip, You NEED These

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

When you read the title of the post, you probably thought I was going to try to sell you some kind of new training equipment out on the market when.

That’s not it at all.

If you want a truly strong grip, there is one thing you need to have that you might not be doing in your training.

I know for a long time when I first started, I left this out, and because of it, my numbers suffered.

Since then, I no longer make that mistake, because I keep this in my training on a regular basis now.

No, it’s not a special piece of equipment.

It’s actually much more simple than that…

If you want a strong grip, you NEED strong wrists.

Think about it this way…

Many of the muscles that control your grip run through your wrist.

So, all the power is running right through that joint.

If you’ve got good wrist strength, that power will pass through well.

If you neglect your wrists, they’ll stay weak, and that means you’ll never reach your potential with your hand strength.

If you don’t have good stability there, you’re SCREWED.

So, the question is, how do you train for wrist strength?

One way is with Sledge Hammer Levering.

Sledge Hammer Levering involves gripping a sledge by the handle and then lifting the head up and down, under control, using wrist strength.

Chances are you already have a Sledge Hammer. If you don’t you can use any type of leverage device.

A mop or mop handle will work great.

Even a baseball bat can do the trick.

Remember, your objective is to work against leverage through a variety of angles, in order to make the wrists as strong as possible.

Because if you don’t have strong wrists, there’s virtually NO WAY you can have a strong grip.

If you want ideas on how to build wrist strength, check this out: Lever Bigger Hammers.

All the best in your training.

Jedd


Bring Up Your Wrist Strength TODAY
Click the Banner Below:

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Mace Swinging Benefits and Purposes

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Today’s question comes from Norm, and it is about Mace Swinging.

    “Hi Jedd
    I picked up your Home Made Strength Online DVD. I’m very happy with the product. My only question is whether the exercise where you swing the mace around your head should be used as a warmup, main strength move, or finisher? -Norm-“

Thanks for the note, Norm. Mace Swinging is a lot of fun, plus is is very versatile, so I put together a quick article for you.

In addition, I just talked with Ryan Pitts, and he just set up a special discount code just for my subscribers.

From Ryan Pitts at Stronger Grip Enterprises:

    “I have been making the handles on some of the maces loadable at request of customer. I will give this upgrade to anyone who uses your diesel5 code. They get 5% off and a bonus $25 value of loadable handle, giving the mace an extra 10-16 lb capacity depending on what kind of media and length of mace they order. -Ryan Pitts-“

To get your own Mace with the custom adjustable-weight handle, use this link:

Special Diesel Crew Link for Custom Handle Maces

Be sure to use the code => diesel5 <= when you check out to get 5% off and get a cool adjustable handle.

The Benefits of Mace Swinging

Maces: Multi-Purpose Tools, Perfect for Warm-up, Strength Work, or Finishers

Is the Mace best used as a Warm-up device, a Strength Movement, or as a Finisher?

The Mace can actually be used for all three of these purposes. Allow me to detail each one…

Mace Training as a Warm-up

When done with a light weight, Mace Training can be a great warm-up for the upper body.

The shoulders, biceps, triceps, and the lower arms get used under light loads very fluidly with Mace Swinging, and this promotes blood flow to the area, lubricating the joints, making them feel good, especially after a long day where you are stuck in a chair or something like that.

In addition, the over the shoulder and behind the head movements of Mace Swinging open up the thoracic region of the torso, which can help you lift heavier later on in the workout.

Maces as a Strength Movement

You can also test your strength and coordination with heavy mace swinging.

I had a giant mace / club made several years ago that I call the Demolition Club.

Here’s a post on the Demolition Club.

It’s literally a giant artillery shell with a handle and it weighs 89lbs. The handle is super thick and there is no ball at the end of the handle, you not only must get your core, torso, and shoulders ready to go in order to swing this thing, but you grip must be ON too.

So, you can load a mace up heavy, especially shot-loadable ones like Ryan Pitts makes here, and keep the repetitions lower for a very challenging strength movement.

Maces as a Finisher

I, generally, use my mace training as a “finisher” of sorts the majority of the time.

During periods where I have no contests to train for, or if I am looking to burn some extra calories, I use Mace Swinging as “Upper Body Cardio,” at the end of the workout, doing a handful of sets for maximum repetitions.

Generally, I will wear some kind of gloves with these, in order to prevent blisters. Plus, my hands have to work a bit harder, so I get a good Grip Strength Challenge out of it.

I even like to do some “Sprint-Style” Mace Swinging, where I try to rip off 20 repetitions as fast as possible for 4 to 6 sets.

So, really, depending on what you want to go for, Mace Swinging can be a great multi-purpose form of training.

I like the shot-loadable Mace that I have, and you can also buy plate loadable ones too.

Good luck with your Mace Training, Norm.

Jedd

P.S. Don’t have a Mace? I gotcha covered:

You can buy a sweet shot-loadable mace here.<= Use code Diesel5 to get 5% off

Build Bigger, Stronger Arms and Wrists: Scale Weight Curls

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

Build Big Arms and Strong Wrists


Superstar Billy Graham

One of my overall goals is to build my arms up to 20″ cold (no pump).

The way I see it, if you are going to get big, you might as well build strength to go along with it.

And if you are going to be strong, then by all means get as big as you can.

With these things in mind, I give you Scale Weight Curls.

A Scale Weight is a block-shaped weight that is used in industrial settings where scales are used.

These weights are calibrated to specific measurements and have handles so that they can be placed on the scale quickly and easily in order to test that a scale is reading accurately.

scale-weights

How to Perform Scale Weight Curls

Scale Weight Curls can be done like any other curl. They can be done free-standing or braced, and can be done in alternating style or both at the same time.

For me, performing them standing has gotten too easy, so I have been doing them in more of a Preacher Curl style, off my Glute Ham Machine. This allows me to keep the movement more concentrated (although cheating is not completely eliminated).

Also, what I look for is to try to keep my wrist in a neutral position throughout the full range of motion. This strengthens the wrist a bit more.

I can usually get up to 3 extra reps per set if I let my wrist buckle, so once I feel that I am losing my neutral position and breaking into ulnar deviation, I generally just stop the set.

Here is a video showing some recent Scale Weight Curls.

Scale Weight Curls

Scale Weights are somewhat hard to come by, because they are a specialized tool, sort of like anvils, and they can be cheap, but I have been lucky enough to score a couple over the years.

Believe me, the collection of grip tools I have amassed has taken me literally years to develop, tons of time to research, and of course, big expenses in order to build.

If you can’t find Scale Weights, another alternative is to try and curl your Kettlebells. Since the kettlebell handle sits out away from the rest of the bell, they will actually be much tougher to curl, and the weights will drop, but you will still get the Leverage Curl effect.

Still, I like the Scale Weight Curl a little better than Kettlebell Curls, just because I can use a bit more weight to challenge the biceps more, while also challenging my wrists.

To take it even further, you can attempt to curl your Scale Weight or Kettlebll in a supinated position. When you do this, you will have to CRUSH DOWN on the handle BIG TIME, or else you won’t be very successful.

I hope you enjoy this variation of Curls.

For more sinister ideas on how to build crazy arm strength, check out Call to Arms.

call-to-arms-reduced

All the best in your training,

Jedd